How Do You Find Focus?

A little change of pace with this post as I reach out to you. Yes You, out there!

How do you find focus and keep it? What do you do in order to keep going on one topic for hours? Especially in this world of continuous bombardment from social media, 24 hour news and a growing inability to “switch off” from everything.

You all know I love what I do as a career. I do however find it a struggle to focus sometimes. Some days I find it so hard to keep my focus on the task at hand even when I am so interested in the topic. Other times I do just fine and at crutch time there is no stopping me. However, I wish I had that momentum every day…maybe that is quite a BIG ask! I do hate being disappointed in myself and am probably pretty hard on myself too.

So What Helps You?

Running/Exercise?

A run in the morning use to help me I think or it was a placebo effect of thinking it would help so it helped…Buuuuut at the moment my ankles are not a fan of the whole running thing (Doctors appointment to be booked!) but, I think there is a chance that I am actually missing it! Do you run or do other workouts that keep you going and help you focus?

Morning Run - Feels good, helps you focus?

Morning Run – Feels good, helps you focus?

What about a good snack?

I know that having nibbles and making sure that I don’t get hungry (HANGRY!) is key to keeping going! However, sitting and eating all day somedays isn’t the healthiest (will need to get on that running again!) even if I do try to choose healthy snacks sometimes it is hard to resist…:

Not the healthier choice this one but they sure were yummy!

Not the healthier choice this one but they sure were yummy!

Little Tipple?

What about when you work late into the evening? Do you find a little tipple helps of hinders? DIVE IN DEEPER HERE

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What’s In A Vessel?

I have had the opportunity to work on a few different platforms during my brief time as a marine biologist and all of them have their ups and downs; with some I favour over others. In this post I thought I would go into a little detail on the pros and cons of different vessel sizes.

SEACR Vessel 2

View from a small vessel with a gray whale off the bow.

Small Vessel

From small vessels which vary between little “tinnys” to high powered ribs you are close to the water level and therefore closer to your species of study.

Using small vessels you can more easily manoeuvre in your study area and conduct focal follows, take samples (such as blow or faecal samples) and switch off your engines. They enable you to travel into areas that would otherwise be impossible with something larger including shallow channels, small inlets and waterways between islands.

View Off Small Vessel 2

View from the stern of a small boat.

They are cheaper to run and you don’t need to have a full crew and Captain, it can just be you (with the correct license and permits) alongside whomever you are collecting data with. You will cover a smaller area over a days research and are a slave to how much fuel you can carry and the weather conditions. If your vessel is completely open then you will also be personally impacted by the elements, think soggy trousers and chilly toes!

KPII - At Sea

Example of a large research vessel.

Large Vessel

From large vessels you are on a much higher platform. You can see a greater distance and can usually travel a lot further off shore, over a longer time period and in more adverse weather conditions.
DIVE IN DEEPER HERE

My Conservation Careers Interview

Back in December 2013 I as approached my Nick Askew of Conservation Careers website. He asked if I would be willing to share my conservation career story for his growing career information website. Of course, I agreed as I am happy to get my story out there and hope it helps other who are starting out in this field or who think it may be the one for them.

That's me looking pretty snazzy!It was really great to talk about what I have done so far in my short career, how I started out, and to share advice as well as any difficulties I have come across while I have worked to grow as a scientist. I did this with the hope that it can help and inspire budding marine biologists and conservation scientists in the world.

You can read my full interview here → How To Start Out In Marine Biology?

My big piece of advice that I gave and stand by is this:

DIVE IN DEEPER HERE

The WA Shark Cull Has To End

It was all over the news for a while and Facebook and probably your Twitter feed too. The Western Australia (WA) shark cull.

It all started because of a high number of shark attacks in quick succession in WA, causing the government to act quickly and rashly, imposing a trial lethal drum-line programme. Now after the end of the trial period (January 25th – April 30th 2014) the WA government are proposing to extend it to a 3-year lethal drum line programme. This time however they need to pass a federal environmental assessment unlike the trial which was granted temporary exemption under national environmental law because it was apparently deemed in the “national interest” of protecting public safety.

The outcomes from a similar 16 year lethal long-line programme operated in Hawaii (1959-1976) were ignored. At the end of the Hawaiian cull scientist concluded that it made no difference to shark attacks. It didn’t matter though as the Australian government decided to go ahead with the 13 week trial despite all the facts stacked against them. Using baited drum lines there were horrific scenes as sharks were baited and hooked then dragged out to sea alive and killed.

Over the 13 week trail 172 sharks were killed 163 of these were tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) while zero were white sharks (Carcharodon carchariasthe species believed to be those involved in the recent attacks.

DIVE IN DEEPER HERE