Riveting Reads.

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A weekly post of riveting reads from my travels around the internet this week! A selection of links, blogs, news articles, scholarly articles and images I am currently loving.

It has been a hectic week for me so only a Riveting Reads post for you all to enjoy this week!

Seven Things We Have Learnt Since Last Earth Day: A cool post on Vox of seven things we have learnt about Earth since last years Earth Day (It was Earth Day yesterday!).

Five Years On From The BP Oil Spill: A very slow recovery is occurring after the devastating oil spill. However, effects are going to linger in the environment for many years to come and we can not predict what will happen as the oil remains in the marine environment buried beneath the sand offshore.

Oceans Are A $24tn Economy: A report commissioned by WWF has shown. Making the oceans the seventh largest economy in the world before the value of oil and wind power. The report warns however, “that nearly two-thirds of the world’s fisheries are “fully exploited” with most of the rest overexploited“. Putting a monetary value on the ocean is sadly needed to make the value of the ocean understood by the business community who don’t necessarily see it for it’s intrinsic value.

Threat Of Neonicotinoids To Bees Becomes Clearer: Two new studies in Nature go deeper into bees response to neonicotinoid laced plants.

The World Association Of Zoos And Aquariums Suspends Japanese Association Of Zoos And Aquariums: After a unanimous vote by World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (Waza) members they have been suspended due to their involvement with the Taiji dolphin hunt.

25 Years Of The Hubble Telescope: Launched by NASA 25 years ago Mashable shares some beautiful images of space taken by the Hubble Telescope.

What have you been reading this week? Let me know in the comments below.


You can also follow along on the Deep Blue Conversations Facebook Page. I post interesting articles related to marine conservation, share awesome stories as well as photos from the marine conservation and environmental world in general. Come on over and have a look! I also have Twitter come and join the conversation you can find me as @Leila_Lula!

Riveting Reads.

{Via}

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A weekly post of riveting reads from my travels around the internet this week! A selection of links, blogs, news articles, scholarly articles and images I am currently loving.

Sea Turtles Don’t Go With The Flow: Through telemetry researchers have discovered that young sea turtles do not actually float with the currents but actually make an effort to swim in a specific direction.

Most Threatened Mammals Map: This map using data from The World Bank shows the number of threatened mammal species in different countries. It is very sad to look at.

One In 10 European Bee Species Facing Extinction: Our most important pollinator is facing a bleak future.

Climate Change Is Changing Whale Migration: Humpback and fin whales in the North Pacific arrived on averaged a day later each year over a 27 year study.

To our knowledge this is the first study showing how such long-lived species adapt to climate change.” Dr. Christine Ramp, University of St Andrews.

Gray Whale Completes Longest Mammal Migration EVER Recorded: Migrating from Russia’s Sakhalin Island to Baja California, Mexico a trip of almost 14,000 miles. Suggesting the possibility that the “endangered” modern population of western gray whales is actually a pioneering group of eastern whales looking to reclaim a former (and much more extensive) migration range.

Lack Of Female Nominees for Canadian Science and Engineering Hall of Fame: Leading to two top Canadian scientists resigning from selection committee after the lack of gender diversity two years in a row.

Thermal imaging technology is being trailed in the Hauraki Gulf to detect surfacing whales: Ship strike is the greatest cause of death for whales in the gulf so new means of whale detection is important to both researchers and the Ports of Aukland

ROV Sperm Whale Encounter: Amazing and rare sperm whale encounter with an ROV from the E/V Nautilus team who run the Nautilus Exploration Program.

What have you been reading this week? Let me know in the comments below.


You can also follow along on the Deep Blue Conversations Facebook Page. I post interesting articles related to marine conservation, share awesome stories as well as photos from the marine conservation and environmental world in general. Come on over and have a look! I also have Twitter come and join the conversation you can find me as @Leila_Lula!

Crying is allowed.

I cry when I’m happy and I cry when I angry, I cry with laughter and I cry with frustration but this does but make me a weaker person or less good and what I do! When a woman cries though people freak out… why o’ why are women all hysterical, is she trying to get attention, is she not getting her own way and manipulating you. I’m here to tell you that this is in fact not the case I am not a hysterical women if bring salty tears with my emotions.

I was reading a post on Dynamic Ecology by Meghan Duffy entitled “There is crying in science. That’s okay” and it really resonated with me. After an emotional week of; missing my family and boyfriend, having some disappointing news and, being insulted about my surfboard mounting technique (after a frustrating hour trying to learn in some sloppy waves), I had cried or welled up a fair few times. For a second I worried that this could be seen as weakness but, I don’t feel weak when I cry I feel all the emotions I mentioned above but never weak or that I can’t go on.

If we’re going to have more women in science – and I hope we will – we’re going to have more crying in science”. one of Meghan Duffy from Dynamic Ecology’s mentors.

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Megan links to an article that includes the unique case of Ben Barres who transitioned from female to male and noticed that with the transition and his increase in testosterone he lost the ability to cry easily. So I am innately built to cry more as a woman and due to my lower levels of testosterone I can’t control the tears that flow sometimes. Therefore, if I ever cry in your office or on your shoulder remember that I am releasing my emotions (good and bad) about the current situation and my life. I am not trying to manipulate your feelings. I also hope that in years to come I remember this simple thing if I am lucky enough to have student who come to me for advice or questions and get emotional. I hope that I don’t think that they are trying to manipulate my feelings and opinions of them and remember I am lucky they feel comfortable in my presence.

So let there be crying in science and in the world. Whether you are woman or a man who is crying it does not matter and it is okay. Let those emotions out, allow the release of your feelings and just cry. It makes you human it allows you to be who you are and it is not a sign of weakness. Remember…Crying Is Allowed.


You can also follow along on the Deep Blue Conversations Facebook Page. I post interesting articles related to marine conservation, share awesome stories as well as photos from the marine conservation and environmental world in general. Come on over and have a look! I also have Twitter come and join the conversation you can find me as @Leila_Lula!

Riveting Reads.

Humpback Whale Blow And Companions Back in British Columbia A welcome back to my weekly post of riveting reads around the internet this week! A list of links of blogs, news articles, scholarly articles and images I am loving this week.

This Storify of the #IAmAScientistBecause: You can read through some of the most fascinating, insightful and funny reasons people are scientists! You can see the #IAmAScientistBecause timeline below:

Story-board your research proposals: I think this is a neat idea to visualise your research plan of attack!

Bremer Canyon “Orca Fest” In News: The research I conducted in Bremer Canyon was briefly in the news here in West Australia!

With the ice melting Polar Bears won’t get enough nutrients from land food: No terrestrial food sources will be as energy-dense as the marine prey of polar bears.

Acoustic telemetry reveals cryptic residency of whale sharks: Neat paper that has discovered that whale sharks remain resident in Mafia Islands, Tanzania year round but just occupy a deeper and further off shore environment during the “off-season”. Sweet use of telemetry.

Brilliant Ted Talk on Shame: Not conservation but a wonderful talk by Brené Brown, I think we should all watch about: “Life is about daring greatly, about being in the arena.

What have you been reading this week? Let me know in the comments below.


You can also follow along on the Deep Blue Conversations Facebook Page. I post interesting articles related to marine conservation, share awesome stories as well as photos from the marine conservation and environmental world in general. Come on over and have a look! I also have Twitter come and join the conversation you can find me as @Leila_Lula!