2015-2016 World Oceans Day Theme Announced…

World Oceans Day has announced the new theme for the 2015-2016 World Oceans Day……

“Healthy Oceans, Healthy Planet.”

square-ocean-heart

How brilliant. I love it.

They are promoting how the oceans influence so many parts of our lives and the planet, just like our hearts pump blood and nourish all areas of our body!

Artisanal_Sierra Leone

Artisanal Fishery Sierra Leone

The ocean provides food for millions of people around the world, is home to so much magnificent wildlife that we find joy and work with. Further to this, the ocean helps to regulate our climate, produce oxygen, and is a massive sink for carbon dioxide. We need to take care of the ocean as it is vital for both our and future generations survival.

A humpback whale in Johnstone Strait, British Columbia.

A humpback whale in Johnstone Strait, British Columbia.

DIVE IN DEEPER HERE

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A Little Jet-Lagged Hello And A New Facebook Page

Unfortunately I don’t have a big new blog post for you this week as I have been travelling back to London and with all the lack of sleep, jet lag, and puppy love I have not been able to write a post up to completion.

I however have several ideas lined up that will come about next week for you all to read! Some ideas for posts include the following:

  • More Current and Topical Issues
  • Crowd Funding
  • Data Collection Methods

Hit me up in the comments if there are any Marine Biology, Marine Mammal Science and Conservation Science topics you would love to hear more about! I would also love to hear more tips on keeping focus on last weeks post!

I have also set up a Facebook page for Deep Blue Conversations. You can head over there and join in the conversation, see interesting news and science posts that don’t make it to full blog post formats and get notifications of new posts. So come on over and say “Hello” to Deep Blue Conversations on Facebook! I would love it if you would Like us…!

See You Next Week!

See You Next Week!

Waiting For Whales To Breathe!

What do you do? I am asked that a lot. Also, what have you been up to recently with all that travelling? I do a lot of different things and everyone thinks I have the most crazy amazing career (and you know, I do!).

It can sound glamorous but what I spend a lot of time doing is just sitting or standing on a boat, eating a delicious combination of; trail mix, crackers, chocolate, and fruit, waiting……

For whales to breathe! 

It is an amazing, but by no means easy way to spend your time. I do however love nearly every minute of it. There are crazy days of high winds and big swells. White caps so severe that you would be lucky to spot a whale blow! On a good day it is the most wonderful place in the world to be, a light breeze in your hair as you scan the horizon waiting for that unusual movement to catch your eye. The whale blow, its massive exhalation of breath.

Blowing killer whale from the A36 brothers in Johnstone Strait, BC.

Blowing killer whale from the A36 brothers in Johnstone Strait, BC.

DIVE IN DEEPER HERE

Spreading The Word – Oceans Initiative

As I mentioned last week, in this post I am going to talk about the amazing guys at Oceans Initiative. They are a team of scientists who’s aim is to research marine life in order to increase our understanding and protect it in an ever changing world. They work in Canada and beyond looking at all kinds of marine life from whales and dolphins all the way to sharks and seabirds.

Oceans Initiative - Science for the sea. (Image from: http://www.oceansinitiative.org)

Oceans Initiative – Science for the sea. (Image from: http://www.oceansinitiative.org)

I was lucky enough to get to know and work with the scientists at Oceans Initiative during my masters degree when I contacted Dr. Rob Williams one of the co-founders and he happily agreed to share one of their vast data sets with me and also to co-supervise my thesis on vessel noise in Haro Strait, BC. Contacting Rob about Oceans Initiative’s research and thesis potential was one of the best decisions I have ever made and led me to where I am today as a scientist. As I said in my previous post, make the leap and contact those interesting researchers.
DIVE IN DEEPER HERE